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1 Understand working relationships in health and social care

Roles in health and social care: range of roles in health and social care eg adult social worker, paramedic, care manager, nursery worker, occupational therapist

Working relationship: a relationship with a work colleague; the nature of a professional relationship; concept of team working; working within agreed guidelines; working towards common goals with a shared purpose; a business relationship

Personal relationship: a relationship with a friend, family member or within a social group; interpersonal relationship; romantic relationship; based on love, liking, family bond or social commitment

Different working relationships in health and social care settings: relationships between co-workers eg colleagues; between worker and manager eg supervisory; relationships within teams eg multidisciplinary team, care planning team; between different health and social care workers eg nurse and care assistant; relationships between different professionals eg health and social care worker and legal advocate; professional relationships with others eg families of individuals


2 Be able to work in ways that are agreed with the employer

Adhere to the scope of the job role: job description as part of a contract of employment; legal responsibility; defined roles and responsibilities; professional commitment; understanding expectations of the job; understanding professional boundaries and working within professional limitations; accountability; used as a means of assessing performance within the job eg for appraisal purposes

Agreed ways of working: access full and up-to-date policies and procedures that relate to the responsibilities of the specific job role, eg health and safety, safeguarding, equal opportunities and inclusive working, security; agreed ways of working may be less formally documented with a micro-employer; implementing agreed ways of working, eg in relation to infection control, anti-discriminatory practice, safety and security, dealing with emergency situations, moving and handling


3 Be able to work in partnership with others

Partnership working: importance of professional relationships with team members, colleagues, other professionals, individuals and their families, friends, advocates or others important to individuals; importance of communication; agreed ways of sharing information; boundaries to sharing information eg on a ‘need to know’ basis; concept of power sharing and empowerment; nature of professional respect; understanding different roles and responsibilities; different professional expectations; multi-agency and integrated working; improving partnership working through effective communication and information sharing; collaboration and team working; multi-agency team meetings and conferences; main principles of “No Secrets” (2000) for multi-agency working in health and social care

Resolving conflicts: skills and approaches needed for resolving conflicts, eg managing stress, remaining calm, being aware of both verbal and nonverbal communication, controlling emotions and behaviour, avoid threatening others, paying attention to the feelings being expressed as well as the spoken words of others, being aware of and respectful of differences, developing a readiness to forgive and forget, having the ability to seek compromise, seeking resolution, being specific with communication, trying not to exaggerate or over-generalise, avoiding accusations, importance of active listening

Access support and advice: knowing how and when to access support and advice about partnership working, eg in relation to sharing information, issues about confidentiality, confusion about roles and responsibilities, professional limitations or expectations, understanding professional boundaries; understanding agreed ways of working for seeking out support; knowing how to access support, eg through manager or supervisor, professional organisation, independent advisory organisations; knowing how and when to access support and advice about resolving conflicts, eg in relation to professional disagreements, issues with individuals or their families, conflict with colleagues or managers; knowing how to access support, eg through mentoring support, employment counselling, independent advisory organisations, trade unions

Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

1. Understand working relationships in health and social care

1.1 Explain how a working relationship is different from a personal relationship

1.2 Describe different working relationships in health and social care settings











2. Be able to work in ways that are agreed with the employer

2.1 Describe why it is important to adhere to the agreed scope of the job role

2.2 Access full and up-to-date details of agreed ways of working

2.3 Implement agreed ways of working










3. Be able to work in partnership with others


3.1 Explain why it is important to work in partnership with others

3.2 Demonstrate ways of working that can help improve partnership working

3.3 Identify skills and approaches needed for resolving conflicts

3.4 Demonstrate how and when to access support and advice about:

  • partnership working

  • resolving conflicts













Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 7: Implement Person-Centred Approaches in Health and Social Care

Unit code:

HSC 026

Unit reference number:

A/601/8140

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

5

Guided learning hours:

33



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings. It provides the learner with the knowledge and skills required to implement person centred approaches.

This is a mandatory unit in both the Edexcel Level 2 Diploma in Health and Social Care (Adults) for England (QCF) and the Edexcel Level 2 Diploma in Health and Social Care (Adults) for Wales and Northern Ireland (QCF).

Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development’s QCF Assessment Principles. Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 must be assessed in a real work environment.

Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.

Content

1. Understand person centred approaches for care and support

Person centred values: individuality; rights; choice; privacy; independence; dignity; respect; partnership; autocracy

Person centred approaches: person centred planning (PCP), particularly in relation to vulnerable individuals, eg individuals with learning disabilities, physical disabilities, mental health issues; person centred thinking skills; total communication; essential lifestyle planning and person centred reviews; Carl Rogers theoretical background to person-centred counselling; the four key principles of rights, independence, choice and inclusion; reflecting the unique circumstances of individuals; embedding person centred values; the importance of individuality; appreciation of individual rights; enabling individuals to make decisions and choices; the importance of privacy; empowering individuals to maintain independence and dignity; treating individuals with respect; respecting individuals’ diversity, culture and values; awareness of risk taking in person-centred approaches, enabling individuals to make informed decisions and understand the consequences eg the harmful effects of smoking, the benefits of taking prescribed medication, the advantages of immunisation

Care and support: document where day-to-day requirements and preferences for care and support are detailed eg care plan, support plan, individual plan; holistic approach to meeting the needs and preferences of individuals; using individual care plans to document individual needs; attention to the detail of treatment and individualised provision; importance of applying a person-centred approach when using care plans; boundaries to information sharing eg on a ‘need to know’ basis


2 Be able to work in a person-centred way

Work in a person-centred way: working towards person-centred outcomes, eg satisfaction with care, involvement with care, feeling of well-being, creating a therapeutic culture; work in ways that recognise individual beliefs and preferences; providing the level of support required rather than what services can manage to achieve; working with the individual’s beliefs and values; providing for physical needs; having sympathetic presence; sharing decision making implementing person-centred planning; the application of person-centred values; communicating with individuals to find out their history, preferences and wishes; importance of working in a non-judgemental way, not discriminating against any individual; ensuring equality and inclusive practice; promoting the independence and autonomy of individuals; empowering individuals to use their strengths and potential


3 Be able to establish consent when providing care or support

Consent: the informed agreement to an action or decision; establishing consent varies according to individual’s assessed capacity to consent

Establish consent: the process of establishing informed agreement to an action or decision with individuals; ensuring individuals have access to the appropriate information; communication skills, (verbal, non-verbal and written); active listening; importance of consultation and inclusive communication; respecting individual’s choices; listening to and responding to individuals’ questions and concerns; responding appropriately to any questions and concerns; working to resolve conflicts if consent cannot be established; seeking extra support and advice where necessary


4 Be able to encourage active participation

Active participation: empowering individuals to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the importance of the individual as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient; empowering individuals to participate in their own care; the benefits for individuals of active participation eg physical benefits, increased independence, autonomy and well-being

Barriers: possible barriers to active participation eg learning disabilities, physical disability or language barriers; ways to reduce barriers to active participation eg use of physical, communication or visual aids


5 Be able to support the individual’s right to make choices

Right to make choices: importance of individual empowerment; universal declaration of human rights; independence and autonomy of individuals; importance of impartiality, being aware of own attitudes, values and beliefs, not allowing personal views to influence an individual’s decision making

Support the individual: developing respectful relationships; the importance of non-judgemental communication and inclusive information; empowering individuals to make informed choices; respecting individual’s choices; empowering and supporting individuals to question or challenge decisions concerning them that are made by others

Risk Assessment: the use of agreed risk assessment processes to support individuals in making choices, eg health and lifestyle choices, decisions about treatment or care; awareness of actual or likely danger or harm arising from choices made eg increased vulnerability, impact on treatment or recovery

6 Be able to promote individuals’ well-being

Well-being: factors eg physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, cultural, religious, social, political

Promoting well-being: the importance of individual identity and self esteem; the links between individual identity, self esteem and well-being; understanding emotional literacy; awareness of individual’s feelings; the importance of privacy, maintaining dignity; providing support and encouragement for individuals; respecting the spiritual, religious and cultural beliefs of individuals; working in partnership to set realistic and achievable goals; empowering individuals to develop confidence, feel good about themselves and raise their self-esteem; eg through positive encouragement, active listening and developing independence and assertiveness creating and maintaining a positive environment to promote the well-being of individuals eg attitudes, activities, surroundings


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria



Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Evidence type

Portfolio reference

Date

  1. Understand person centred approaches for care and support




1.1 Define person-centred values

1.2 Explain why it is important to work in a way that embeds person centred values

1.3 Explain why risk-taking can be part of a person centred approach

1.4 Explain how using an individual’s care plan contributes to working in a person centred way










2. Be able to work in a person-centred way.

2.1 Find out the history, preferences, wishes and needs of the individual

2.2 Apply person centred values in day to day work taking into account the history, preferences, wishes and needs of the individual










3. Be able to establish consent when providing care or support

3.1 Explain the importance of establishing consent when providing care or support

3.2 Establish consent for an activity or action

3.3 Explain what steps to take if consent cannot be readily established










4. Be able to encourage active participation



4.1 Describe how active participation benefits an individual

4.2 Identify possible barriers to active participation

4.3 Demonstrate ways to reduce the barriers and encourage active participation










5. Be able to support the individual’s right to make choices

5.1 Support an individual to make informed choices

5.2 Use agreed risk assessment processes to support the right to make choices

5.3 Explain why a worker’s personal views should not influence an individual’s choices

5.4 Describe how to support an individual to question or challenge decisions concerning them that are made by others










6. Be able to promote individuals’ well-being

6.1 Explain how individual identity and self esteem are linked with well-being

6.2 Describe attitudes and approaches that are likely to promote an individual’s well-being

6.3 Support an individual in a way that promotes a sense of identity and self esteem

    • Demonstrate ways to contribute to an environment that promotes well-being.
















Learner name:

Date:

Learner signature:

Date:

Assessor signature:

Date:

Internal verifier signature:
(if sampled)

Date:




Unit 8: Contribute to Health and Safety in Health and Social Care

Unit code:

HSC 027

Unit reference number:

R/601/8922

QCF level:

2

Credit value:

4

Guided learning hours:

33



Unit summary

This unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings. It provides the learner with the knowledge and skills required to carry out their work safely.

This is a mandatory unit in both the Edexcel Level 2 Diploma in Health and Social Care (Adults) for England (QCF) and the Edexcel Level 2 Diploma in Health and Social Care (Adults) for Wales and Northern Ireland (QCF).


Assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in accordance with Skills for Care and Development's QCF Assessment Principles.

Learning outcomes 4, 5, and 8 must be assessed in a real work environment.

Assessment methodology

Learning outcomes 4, 5, and 8 are assessed in the workplace. Learners can enter the types of evidence they are presenting for assessment and the submission date against each assessment criterion. Alternatively, centre documentation should be used to record this information.


Content

1. Understand own responsibilities, and the responsibilities of others, relating to health and safety in the work setting

Legislation relating to general health and safety: relevant, up to date legislation from the Health and Safety Commission and Executive (HSC/E), including local, national and European requirements for health and safety in a health and social care work setting eg Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981, Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR), Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH)

    Health and safety policies and procedures: agreed ways of working and approved codes of practice in health and social care settings relating to health and safety; dealing with accidents, injuries and emergency situations eg operating, reporting and recording procedures; first aid situations eg hygiene procedures, administering basic first aid if trained to do so, reporting and recording procedures; working conditions and the working environment eg moving and handling procedures; use of equipment eg regulations for using mechanical or electrical equipment); health care procedures eg procedures for administering personal care; food handling and preparation eg food hygiene regulations; infection control and dealing with hazardous substances eg procedures for disposing of clinical waste; security and personal safety eg procedures for personal security and safeguarding personal property

Own responsibilities: the individual duty to take care of own health and safety; understanding and applying relevant legislation and agreed ways of working; responsibility to undertake relevant training and updating as required; the importance of co-operating with others on health and safety; importance of the correct use of anything provided for individual health, safety or welfare eg protective clothing, specialised equipment; understanding that certain tasks should not be carried out without special training eg use of equipment, first aid, administering medication, health care procedures, food handling and preparation

Responsibilities of employers and others: the duty of employers to provide information eg about risks to health and safety from working practices, changes that may harm or affect health and safety, how to do the job safely, what is done to protect health and safety, how to get first-aid treatment, what to do in an emergency; the duty of employers to provide training to do the job safely, protection such as special clothing, gloves or masks, health checks such as vision testing; the duty of employers to provide HSC/E information “Health and safety law: What you should know”, with contact details of people who can help or provide further information; responsibilities of others eg team members, other colleagues, those who use or commission their own health or social care services, families, carers or advocates.

Tasks that should not be carried out without special training: use of equipment, first aid, medication, health care procedures, food handling and preparation.

2 Understand the use of risk assessments in relation to health and safety

Assess health and safety hazards: understanding health, safety and risk assessment for the work environment or particular activities; the importance of risk assessment for protecting self and individuals from danger or harm; the need to comply with the law; identifying what could cause harm; taking precautions to prevent harm; the importance of minimising accidents, injuries and ill health; reducing the risk of individuals being injured at work; reducing the risk of liability; reducing costs to the organisation

Report potential health and safety risks: importance of continuous assessment of risks and regular checking; reporting identified risks immediately; importance of reporting any changes; examine examples of risk assessment reports, accident report forms and other relevant documentation; importance of written records being clear and accurate, detailing dates, times, simple description of hazard identified and action taken; agreed reporting procedures and lines of communication

Individual rights and health and safety concerns: using risk assessment procedures, regulations and relevant health and safety legislation to justify compliance for specific procedures or actions eg wearing seat belts in a car to minimise injury, wearing a motor cycle helmet for protection, hand washing and wearing latex gloves to minimise the spread of infection; understanding that the use of risk assessment can help to address dilemmas between the human rights of an individual and health and safety concerns; values and principles from “Investing for Health” (2002)

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